Dating vintage gillette razors

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Although the clean-shaven look has been in style periodically since at least the 12th Egyptian Dynasty, or around 2000 B.

C., the earliest recognizable razors date to the 17th century in Europe.

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Modern razors rely on the first blade pulling the hair (and subsequent blades cutting the hair afterwards) which can lead to infection of the hair follicle.

Vintage, double-edge razors have a single blade that cuts the hair, which is less irritating to the follicle.

To soften a beard for shaving, towels were heated in a steam cabinet and wrapped around a man’s chin; to minimize nicks and razor burn, foaming soap suds were mixed in a shaving mug using a brush made from badger or hog whiskers.

These serial numbers were on the top of the guard, or sometimes the inner barrel.

There were no razor serial numbers from 1931 until 1951.

These iron tools were shaped like small hatchets, but were eventually modified to include a pivot, allowing the sharpened blade to remain protected within the handle or “scales.” By the 19th century, razors had evolved from a wedge-shaped blade to a more modern straight razor design, with blades made from silver steel, an alloy produced by incorporating carbon into the metal.

Handles were often made from tortoise shell, horn, wood, bone, and, later, cellulite, while higher-end pieces included finer materials like ivory, mother of pearl, and sterling silver, as well as artwork carved into their handles or blades.

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